Egg
Egg
Egg

Egg

Amy Sky Koster (Author)

Lisel Jane Ashlock (Illustrator)

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Bird eggs come in so many beautiful colors, sizes, and shapes, but best of all is what's inside them!

Reviews

This creative board book introduces young readers to bird eggs with different shapes, colors, and designs. Realistic illustrations are in watercolor and pencil, and each page has one large picture. In most cases there are two words underneath. For example, the text “Tiny egg” is next to an illustration of a very small egg. It is the perfect amount of information to teach very young children about science. Back matter includes illustrations of the 13 different eggs featured and has the name of the bird below. This title introduces STEM concepts in an appealing way for young children. It will whet their appetite to learn more about the world around them. Readers might even see some eggs representing the kind of birds that live in their neighborhood. Adult readers may be inspired to pick up a bird book to learn more. Highly recommended for public and school libraries. This board book will spark curiosity in children and adults, too.

–Robin Sofge, School Library Journal , 4/1/2020

A graciously illustrated rhyming ode to eggs. Wrapped in its own firm shell, this compact board book has a solid, padded cover and opens onto stiff, matte cardboard pages. Creamy white backgrounds highlight each page’s avian-related vignette, ranging from a greenish-gold “shiny egg” to a “dotted egg” with an elaborately lined, blue iridescent feather nestled in front. Though each page features an accurately drawn egg, there’s enough variation among the depictions—a large tropical flower overhanging a tiny vervain hummingbird egg, a chickadee incubating her eggs, a silly but “sweet” foil-wrapped chocolate egg—that the content feels fresh. Ink drawings in subdued colors are fine and delicate, clearly conveying the subtle differences among each bird species, and eggs and nests manage to look both fragile and solid. Related in two-word rhyming couplets consisting of one descriptor word followed by “egg,” the text achieves a smooth, catchy sound. A useful illustrated key at the back identifies the eggs, though some, like a “sea egg” identified as a great blue heron’s or those of less-familiar birds, such as the cassowary, beg for more context or even a picture of the bird itself. A tall, thin typeset keeps the focus on the lovely eggshells but is hard to read from a distance; sharp corners on the board pages make this case-bound board book unsuitable for the youngest listeners. Egg-quisite.

Kirkus , 2/15/2020