See This Little Dot
See This Little Dot
See This Little Dot

See This Little Dot

Jane Yolen (Author)

Laëtitia Devernay (Illustrator)

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The characteristics and possible functions of a dot are imaginatively described in this illustrated picture book, concluding that the shape’s best use is as a period marking The End.

Reviews

Circles of varied sizes fill the pages of this expansive ode to the sense of possibility that can be found in a simple dot. The titular opening line leads to a rhythmic list of things that “this little dot” isn’t: “It’s not/ just a blot/ on a page,” nor the “wide-open eye/ of a cat.” Rather, rhyming text points to the round mark’s scalability as well as its “oomph, roll, and zest.” Devernay, leaning on a limited palette of black, blue, red, and white, supplies shapely cut-paper visuals that often obliquely pair with Yolen’s text. In one spread, penguins and fish swim alongside an ink-squirting squid, accompanying “Not just a spot/ of ink/ on a shirt.” On another page, a white dog bounces a red dot high and low, until the orb halts by the curled-up pup, onto whose sleeping form black spots cascade. Coming to a sudden close, it’s a crisply energetic celebration that considers the humble dot’s many permutations.

Publishers Weekly, 01/05/2024

Fun, special, and thoroughly 'kid friendly', "See This Little Dot" by veteran children's author Jane Yolen, and the illustrations by gifted artist Laetitia Devernay is a unique and to-be-treasured pick for family, elementary school, and community library picture book collections for children ages 5-7.

Midwest Book Review, 01/17/2024

The dot may seem like a simple item in a picture or in its use. However, Yolen (author) and Devernay (illustrator) share with the reader, many ways that dots are used. The dot can vary in size and be as huge as the moon or as small as a period. The illustrations show a variety of dots used as a part of the picture. The dots on the page are a part of an animal like a fly’s eye or the spots on a feline. During the reading, young children may point out the different uses of the dot in the pictures...There are many dots used in the layout; the picture shows different possibilities like eyes, spots, and bubbles. After reading the book, teachers may have students create their own pictures with dots as part of read aloud extension activity. Children may have fun using their imagination to further explore the use of dots in their own creations.

Children's Literature, 02/17/2024

True to its mission of pairing clear and compelling written content with “the most brilliant illustrations,” Creative Editions—an imprint of The Creative Company, founded in 1932—can be proud of their next thought-provoking and eye-catching creation in Jane Yolen’s and Laetitia Devernay’s newest picture book, See This Little Dot.Yolen demonstrates her imaginative, free-verse writing style in the concise prose on each page, producing more of a thought than a story about the nature of the ubiquitous dot—not just in art but in nature and everything else that surrounds us.But the true beauty of this book lies in French artist and graphic designer Laetitia Devernay’s unique, detailed, cut-out illustrations that accompany Yolen’s text. From the buttons atop trumpet valves to the dirt and wheels on roller skates to the eyes of birds, circus animals, squid, snails and flying insects—Devernay provides countless examples of how the simple dot permeates the world around us. Her straightforward and vibrant colors and textures make every image pop off the page in a way that begs you to touch it, as well as to attempt recreation with scissors and construction paper of your own. The highlights are the large, globular, mandala-like patterns of colorful insects and birds that seem to glow against their black backgrounds, each juxtaposed with a single planetary circle in the distance.See This Little Dot picture book would make a good addition to every elementary, middle- and even high-school art classroom and will certainly make an eye-catching addition to your child’s bookshelf.

–Melissa B. Rooney, New York Journal of Books, 03/14/2024

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