Sashiko
Sashiko
Sashiko
Sashiko

Sashiko

Barbara Ciletti (Author)

Maria Cristina Pritelli (Illustrator)

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The elegant textile art of Sashiko is celebrated in this picture book about the embroidery style's origins as a way to strengthen the jackets of fishermen from Awaji Island.

Reviews

With meditative prose and soft-edged imagery, the creators weave a mythlike history of sashiko, a traditional Japanese style of embroidery that dates to the 17th century. A kimono-clad child recounts the tale. Father, a fisherman on Awaji Island, works year round: when “cherry blossoms bloom” and when “hillsides are blue with icy mist.” After snow and cold result in empty nets, the narrator’s mother stitches three jackets together, whispering her hope that the thread will “run like the fish of summer,” Ciletti writes. Covered in short stitches and becoming a model for other garments, the warm jacket marks the start of sashiko. Pritelli’s traditional-leaning visuals glow with luminous tones even while being vague about time period. An author’s note describes the history of sashiko, but omits details about the creators’ research.

Publisher's Weekly, 07/21/2022

Barbara Ciletti relates the development of the stitch through a long-ago fictional narrator, a young girl who lives on Awaji Island, where sashiko originated. In spare language, the child explains to readers ages 6-10 that in winter her father and the other fishermen suffer from the cold: “They come home in empty boats, freezing in their thin cloth jackets.” Hunger follows cold. Something must be done. The girl watches her mother set to work: “One, two, three jackets together. Her long needle pokes white cotton thread into cloth as blue as the summer sea.” Illustrator Maria Cristina Pritelli evokes the look of sashiko in her soft, glowing pictures; there’s also a touch of Hokusai in her rendering of fishermen amid icy, white-capped seas. “Sashiko” is an unusual title not only in its subject—when did you last see a children’s book about embroidery?—but also in its beauty.

–Meghan Cox Gurdon, Wall Street Journal, 07/29/2022

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